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Fairy Tales-The Darker, The Better

I love fairy tales! When I was about nine or ten I went through every fairy tale book I could lay my hands on. My mum had to take me to the library and the book store on a regular basis. In the end I had a lovely collection.

The Disney films were okay, but I usually found them a little boring and too sweet, especially if I’d read the original version.

Brothers Grimm and Hans Christina Andersen were a regular staple. I loved the adventures and the fact that evil always got its come-uppance. No matter what, good would always triumph. I think my need for a HEA started there;). Then I received a copy of a book of Russian Fairy Tales. It had cloth binding and black figures were stencilled into the red cover. It also had a red ribbon as a bookmark. I was in heaven. I also realised the stories were quite violent and scary, but in an abstract manner. Family members would die, limbs would come off and the hero would sometimes reach the heroine only moments after something horrible happened.

And it didn’t matter!

I still went to bed reading fairy tales. I mentioned it to my mum and she wore her concerned face. I had to reassure her that it didn’t have bad dreams.

Unfortunately I grew older and fairy tales moved more and more into the background. Reading all these great posts has reminded me how much I loved fairy tales. It has also made me dig out my e-reader and the free copy of Japanese Fairy Tales. Looking at the fabulous stories from an adult point of view I believe a country’s fairy tales shows some of the attitude and way of life of a culture.

I love it when someone takes a well-known fairy tale and reinvents it.

Fairy tales are amazing and great for every age. They are available all over the place. Take a moment, sit down and read a tale, either one you remember fondly or try something completely different.

And above all: have fun!

Happy Easter to everyone who celebrates and have a great weekend.

Tina Christopher Writer of Sexy Steampunk and Sensuous Sci-Fi available at Ellora’s Cave and Amazon.

We all have a little ugly in us…

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One of my favorite fairy tales is Hans Christian Andersen’s The Ugly Duckling.

The mother duck is hatching her last egg, one which is different from all the others that already hatched into lovely little duckettes. There’s wild speculation about what type of egg it is, because it’s big and not at all like her other eggs. Is it a turkey? The mother decides she will sit on her egg a little longer until it hatches despite it not being a duck.

At last the large egg broke, and a young one crept forth crying, “Peep, peep.” It was very large and ugly. The duck stared at it and exclaimed, “It is very large and not at all like the others. I wonder if it really is a turkey. We shall soon find it out, however when we go to the water. It must go in, if I have to push it myself.”

Poor duckling, so unlike his siblings. An outcast, black sheep and worst of all, different. During my childhood, I remember thinking that I never quite fit in. It was an internal thing with me. I had friends and fun in school, but a part of me never completely fit the social mode. I call it The Me, Not Me syndrome.

Because the duckling doesn’t look like everyone else, the other ducks bite him and tease him. One duck wants him to leave. I love how the mother sticks up for her odd little son, seeing the good in him and downplaying his ugliness. Character over beauty.

“Let him alone,” said the mother; “he is not doing any harm.”

“Yes, but he is so big and ugly,” said the spiteful duck “and therefore he must be turned out.”

“That is impossible, your grace,” replied the mother; “he is not pretty; but he has a very good disposition, and swims as well or even better than the others. I think he will grow up pretty, and perhaps be smaller; he has remained too long in the egg, and therefore his figure is not properly formed;” and then she stroked his neck and smoothed the feathers, saying, “It is a drake, and therefore not of so much consequence. I think he will grow up strong, and able to take care of himself.”e others are very pretty children,” said the old duck, with the rag on her leg, “all but that one; I wish his mother could improve him a little.”

The duckling finds himself alone in the big world. Being ugly isn’t all bad because it saves him from being hunted. He discovers his love for water and wants to find his own path.

“You don’t understand me,” said the duckling.

“We don’t understand you? Who can understand you, I wonder? Do you consider yourself more clever than the cat, or the old woman? I will say nothing of myself. Don’t imagine such nonsense, child, and thank your good fortune that you have been received here. Are you not in a warm room, and in society from which you may learn something. But you are a chatterer, and your company is not very agreeable. Believe me, I speak only for your own good. I may tell you unpleasant truths, but that is a proof of my friendship. I advise you, therefore, to lay eggs, and learn to purr as quickly as possible.”

Instead of taking the advice of others, he goes out in the world again, searching for where he belongs. It’s this journey of self-discovery that transforms him into his true self – a beautiful swan. Others now appreciate his beauty, yet, all those times he was jeered at, teased and told that he was ugly has scarred him. At first he’s ashamed for being happy that he’s beautiful. When this moment passes, he allows his happiness and joy to shine through.

Then he rustled his feathers, curved his slender neck, and cried joyfully, from the depths of his heart, “I never dreamed of such happiness as this, while I was an ugly duckling.”

I love ‘ugly duckling’ stories – a person’s journey in finding their true self. In romance, often times our hero(ines) are beautiful, handsome, powerful, seemingly perfect. The characters that stand out are the one’s that are flawed. Everyone has some ‘ugly duckling’ in them and if brought out in a story, it makes the character real, complex and fascinating to watch their discovery of what’s truly important.

Viki Lyn
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Viki Lyn: Award winning author of male/male paranormal and contemporary romances. You can find all of Viki’s books at the following sites: Amazon, All Romance Ebooks and GLBT Bookshelf.

Pride will be the death of him.

When psychic Nate Coleman dreams of a murder, he knows it’s a premonition. He can’t forget the image of his ex-lover with a bullet hole through his chest. Nate has no choice but to confront William and face the skeptical scientist’s ridicule.

Dr. William Ryner doesn’t believe in what he can’t prove. When Nate comes back into his life, it’s not to rekindle their love, but to bring up more of that mumbo jumbo that split them apart.

Despite William’s refusal to listen, Nate can’t ignore the premonition. And, William can’t ignore Nate. Before the gunman strikes, William must either trust in Nate’s ability or rely only on the facts, but if he does the latter, pride could be the death of him.

The Curse of Levity and the Love of Gravity

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The truth is, I have a ton of favorite fairy tales, the darker the better. Bluebeard or The Wild Swans, for example, appeal to that side of me. But there is no doubt that one of my all time favorites is The Light Princess by George MacDonald. Given that the story centers around a princess who has been cursed to lose her gravity, one might image it to be a light tale, full of humor and jokes. It isn’t that at all, however. There are few crueler things than someone who cannot empathize with pain or sadness and The Light Princess demonstrates that well.

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In fact, I was so inspired by the many questions the story brings up about the ties between an ability to experience pain and the ability to experience love, that the first fairy tale Keira and I worked on for our Tempting Tales series was an erotic, m/m rewrite of the story. We chose it because the themes were so fascinating, but also because when the gender of the protagonists change from a m/f story to a m/m story, it highlights those issues even more by removing the sharp edge of misogyny inevitably present in the original work.

The outcome of our experiment is titled Earthly Desires, and we are quite proud of it.

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An Excerpt from Earthly Desires

Dmitri didn’t understand it, but as he gazed at Efrosin’s lips, he felt a heretofore unfamiliar, and yet compelling surge of need pulse through him, and before he could stop himself, he leaned forward and kissed those lips. The answering gasp, followed by more laughter that seemed to fill his own mouth and tickle against his palate, did not discourage him at all.

Efrosin’s lips were soft and his tongue was slick and he didn’t pull away from Dmitri’s clumsy attempt, but rather deepened the kiss in a way that made Dmitri’s toes curl and blood rush to his cock. For a confused moment he thought he was kissing an angel before he remembered that he was only kissing a prince. A free-floating, beautiful, powerful, laughing prince. Perhaps “only” was not quite the proper word.

“Lovely,” Efrosin exclaimed, pulling away and licking his lips. “I hope you intend to ravish me, because I have always imagined it would be quite fun to be ravished. No one’s ever tried it with me, alas.” Efrosin frowned a little and licked his mouth. “You taste like dirt. It’s delicious, though I’ve never enjoyed the taste of dirt before. How odd.”

“You taste like clouds,” Dmitri said, hoping it was a compliment.

“I ate quite a few during my journey to this tree,” Efrosin said. “I…feel a bit strange. Quick. Kiss me again.”

Dmitri, reminded of Efrosin’s perilous flight, came to his senses, and while he was not willing to say that he would not kiss the prince again, he did think there were just a few things that should be accomplished first. “We must get you down.”

Efrosin frowned, seeming much less intent on getting back to the earth now that he had company in the tree. “But you will kiss me again?”

“Once we’re safe.” Dmitri looked down to choose which limbs they should try, and immediately wished he hadn’t. His head swirled with the distance between his body and the earth below. He’d never before climbed so high.

“Safe is such a thrilling state of being. I can’t remember the last time I felt safe. Grip my hands,” Efrosin said. “Don’t let go.”

Dmitri took Efrosin’s smooth hands into his own, and Efrosin began to shake with amusement again. “Your calluses tickle. Now, hold tight. It will be fun.”

“What will be?” Dmitri asked.

“Jump.”

“What?”

“We are tied hand and foot, and you have hold of my hands. All will be well. Trust me.”

It was surprisingly hard to trust laughing royalty. “We’ll die. It’s too far.”

“Too far? What a silly notion.”

Dmitri’s last thought when Efrosin kicked his feet out from under him with a strong swipe was, At least I got to kiss him. They tumbled into the air, crashing into branches below until Efrosin pushed off against the tree trunk, thrusting them both clear. It was only then Dmitri realized how slowly the ground rose up to meet them.

“Your weight to bring us down,” Efrosin sang in his ear. “My levity to keep us from being quite smashed.” There was more laughter, and then a curl of words in his ear, which, coupled with the rush of adrenaline coursing through his veins, made Dmitri’s cock stiffen against the hard bone of Efrosin’s hip. “And you will ravish me, won’t you? Once we’re on the ground. You promised. You’re so handsome, and your hands are so big. I’m aquiver at the thought of you on me, in me, touching me—”

“Oh my God,” Dmitri choked. “Do you speak to everyone who gets you down from trees this way?”


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Buy Earthly Desires at Ellora’s CaveAmazonBarnes & NobleSony and All Romance eBooks.


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Keira Andrews and Leta Blake write fairy tale inspired m/m erotica and romantica with Ellora’s Cave. Check out Ascending Hearts, available through Ellora’s Cave, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Sony, and others! And also remember to look at Earthly Desires, the first book in the Tempting Tales series, available for purchase at AmazonBarnes and Noble, and Ellora’s Cave.

Hands Down… Snow White

I love the story of Snow White. It has a little of everything… magic, betrayal, jealousy, the fight between good and evil, all that fun stuff. Now, even the Disney version has those things, but the original story is much darker, as is true with most fairy tales, which have been sanitized for modern children—who apparently are hardy enough to play Grand Theft Auto, but too delicate for dark literature!

Of course, like many heroines of the early Middle Ages, Snow White is pretty daft (they don’t call that period the Dark Ages for nothing!) and the queen gets not one but three chances to kill her, once she realizes the huntsman didn’t do the job the first time around. But, despite that, it’s still my favorite, because each time I think I’ve seen or read the very last interpretation I can of it, some wonderful author comes up with another. I’ve read Sapphic, vampiric, erotic and adventure interpretations, even a BDSM one, and each retelling highlights a different facet of the story, sometimes even introduces me to one I hadn’t considered.

Maybe that’s why it remains my favorite. It’s a story in and of itself, yet has enough nuances and levels that it lends itself to true longevity. After all, there’s no higher compliment than imitation and I think Snow White, its themes and sub-plots, will continue to spawn new stories as long as humans still exist.

For two of my favorite modern versions, check out Snow, by Deborah M. Brown, and Snow, Glass, Apples by Neil Gaiman, found in his Smoke and Mirrors anthology.

Anya
Journeys Through Seduction

Anya Richards/Anya Delvay books available from Samhain Publishing, Ellora’s Cave, Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and Chapters Indigo.

A Second Vote for Beauty and the Beast With a Great Big But…

Illustration at page 39 in Europa's Fairy Book
Beauty and the Beast reigns as my favorite fairy tale (not to mention TV show, movie, doll sets) and has since I was a little girl.  It has so much good stuff packed into such a short little story. Danica nailed so much of it in her post. Here are a few more:

  • The true nature of love, that which lies in the realm of the heart and soul,
  • The power and limitations of seeing the world predominantly through our eyes. How what we see so quickly creates images, expectations and assumptions that we then have to work beyond to see the real prize beneath.
  • The power of redemption and forgiveness. The beast was serving a sentence for a cruel act. He learned, grew and found redemption first in his own heart, then from another. It does not eradicate the scars, but tempers their pain.
  • The need for reflection–how sometimes we have to step outside a situations to see it clearly, as Beauty did when she first leaves the Beast.
  • The karma of loyalty.  Beauty’s reward for unselfish love is ultimately love returned.

So rich in goodness, and yet, I do have a great big BUT…

I can’t imagine the story reversed, where the man sees through female ugliness to find the true beauty inside.  Women also carry a beast inside, although it may take a different form than the male.  For me, it the story is to achieve its full power, the values it puts forth must apply to all of us, no matter the actual starting point.

Anyone want to take that on, give me an example where it might be true? Where the male sees through ugliness and tames the beast in the woman?

I would love to be wrong.


Sabrina Garie is on a journey to create the most kick-ass heroine in romance fiction. You can meet the first heroine in Fires of Justice at Elloras Cave, Amazon, and Barnes and Noble.

I Like Them Beastly

The theme this time around is our favorite fairy tales.

I’m’ a writer, but first and foremost, I’m a reader. I’ve always enjoyed a good story and even better, I loved happy endings. My absolute favorite fairy tale is one that still appeals to me as much now as it did when I was a kid. Beauty and the Beast is one of those stories that works in so many ways.

You have the heroine, who while beautiful is also loyal and intrepid. I mean, I like to think I’d sacrifice my own happiness and freedom for the ones I love, but I’ve never had it put to the test. She doesn’t even really think twice, does she? She just does it. That’s true love, the kind that most people would love to have directed at them.

Then we have our beast. *Sigh* I’m a sucker for a tortured hero. I really am. He brought it on himself with his vanity and selfishness and he’s suffering for it. Ugly, disfigured and lonely, he’s the opposite of our Beauty. And the bargain he strikes with her is one guaranteed to make her miserable, which I believe is his intention. Misery loves company and all that, right?

But like with any great love story, a metamorphosis takes place. I’m going to use Disney’s version because I found I actually liked it. But basically, Beauty’s love and light penetrates Beast’s darkness and self-hatred. They begin to balance each other. I used to play a text-based RPC as a druid, a neutral guild. I guess that suited my personality the best because I strongly believe you can’t have all goodness and light, or all evil and darkness. You need both, because without one you’d never be able to appreciate the other.

To me, that’s what Beauty and the Beast represents. It’s the balancing of Beauty’s goodness and Beast’s darkness because no matter that they break the spell, that they fall in love, that darkness will remain with him. Or at least that’s what I like to think. His lesson is learned, but the scars are still there to remind him not to take the light and beauty for granted.

Pretty heavy, huh?

Who are some of your favorite “beastly” heroes from books or movies? My personal favorites are Zsadist from the Black Dagger Brotherhood, Lothaire from Immortals After Dark and nearly any of the heroes from Elizabeth Hoyt’s historical romances.

How to Survive a Zombie Apocalypse by The Sisters Grimm

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by 3oneseven
Warning! Flashing on that site! Migraine or seizure trigger alert!

 Since perhaps even before the Cranberries’ song Zombie in 1994, the connection between war, apocalyptic thinking, and zombies has been in the widespread cultural consciousness. It’s to the point that university professors and the CDC have taken interest in the phenomenon, though maybe for different reasons. It’s to the point that there are articles out there trying to impress upon us the positive influence this zombie fixation can have on our psychology. Is it any wonder that a large number of people are mashing zombies up with another phenomenon of the zeitgeist–the return of mass popular fascination with fairy tales? (See the bottom of this post for links around the web to fascinating and amusing mash-ups of zombies and fairy tales.)

When Keira and I were assigned the theme “How would you survive the zombie apocalypse?” we immediately decided to to mash the two ideas ourselves, given our own love of fairy tales. We decided to see how–or if–some of our favorite fairy tale characters might survive a zombie apocalypse.

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by Lora Zombie

Little Red Riding Hood. Would she survive? We believe she would. With the help of her massive, vicious, protective, sentient, talking wolf friend (and maybe a machine gun in accord with this drawing by Lora Zombie), Red could definitely hold off the zombies and make a cozy home of a wolf den. There are all kinds of incredibly filthy stories that might come of that scenario, but I’ll leave that to your own perverted imaginations. Or you can bleach your brain now, if you like. I’ll wait here.

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by punziesshiftedworld

Rapunzel. Would she survive? We believe she would. For awhile. As the zombies crowd around the base of her tower, Rapunzel watches safely from her tower above, refusing to let down her hair. Eventually, though, it becomes clear that her beloved prince and her evil captor have both lost their yummy brains to the zombies below. Trapped as she is in her tower, Rapunzel must make a terrible choice–die of dehydration and starvation or lower her hair to creatures of the night below.

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by Anka Zhuravleva

The Light Princess. Would she make it out alive? We think that the Light Princess stands one of the best chances for successful zombie evasion–assuming she doesn’t find herself completely untethered to float away into the stratosphere to freeze and suffocate. When the zombies approach, the Light Princess could bound to the top of buildings, float to grip the uppermost twigs of trees, and dangle herself off the church spires, climbing down to collect food and water when the coast was clear. Alas, her poor prince would probably be zombified, but the princess herself could likely survive quite some time. (By the way, Keira and I wrote a m/m version of The Light Princess called Earthly Desires.)

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by yusef abonamah

Jack (and the Beanstalk). Would he make it? Well, most of the time it would be touch and go for him, but we think there are a few ways that Jack might survive the zombie apocalypse. The first and most obvious step would be for Jack to climb the beanstalk to escape the crowd of zombies. He’d have to get to the top before them all, and then, of course, he’d have to deal with the giant. This is where the possibilities really open up for him. He could try to somehow destroy the beanstalk before the zombies get to the top, hoping that he can accomplish it before the giant smells his delicious English blood. Or he could hide, wait for the zombies to reach the top, and hope the giant takes care of them himself. I’m pretty sure the giant could defeat the zombies. I think he’d have the strength to toss them, one after another, off the side of the cloud, and he’d probably be more successful at destroying the stalk than Jack would be. He’s likely only left it up this long in order to seduce humans up it in order to supplement his food supply with tasty flesh and bones. So, truly, this is probably Jack’s best bet.

Once the giant has tossed the zombies over, destroyed the stalk so no more can climb up, Jack would then need to deal with the giant. He could go the traditional route of cutting off his head (see picture above) or perhaps he might be a bit sneakier than that, choosing instead to attempt to befriend the giant, introduce him to the idea of vegetarianism, or at least seduce him into embracing a diet free of human flesh. There are other options, of course, but I think it all hinges on Jack beating the zombies up the beanstalk and then being able to either kill or befriend the giant.

Another possibility that would be fun would be if the giant cannot destroy the stalk, and so zombies are a constant threat. I’m now imagining a scenario where Jack hides out in the castle, and he and the giant are foes at first, but finally they begin to work together to defeat the zombie threat. Eventually friendship blossoms and then love blooms. It’s the classic danger scenario bringing to enemies together that so many grand romances are made of. Speaking of, while there are no zombies, Keira and I did pen a hate-to-love Jack and the Beanstalk story, which you can purchase HERE.

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Welcome to the Zombie/Fairy Tale Zeitgeist!

1. Kevin Richey’s Zombie Fairy Tales: “Kevin Richey’s Zombie Fairy Tales are a monthly series of short stories set in a dark fairy tale universe plagued by zombies. Surreal and full of black humor, installments feature familiar childhood characters as they encounter a world of stark violence and horror — Cinderella is worked to death before the ball, Pinocchio is made from children’s corpses, and Little Red Riding Hood finds more than wolves in the forest. New titles will appear on the 13th of each month throughout 2012. The series features overlapping elements, characters, and places for a more immersive experience for the dedicated fan, but can also be read as stand-alone entries in any order.”

2. Little Red Riding Hood: A Zombie Fairy Tale GAME: “Little Dead Riding Hood is a racing game. Each player assumes the role of one of the Riding Hood sisters trying desperately to get supplies to their beloved grandmother. Simple really, except for those pesky zombie wolves.” (I’m not sure why the wolves need to be zombies and not just, you know, wolves, but there you have it!)

3. Snow White and the Seven Dead Dwarves: A Zombie Fairytale: “Fast-paced and violent with a lot of zombie carnage (seriously; A LOT) make SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DEAD DWARFS a really fun read.”

4. Zombie Fairy Tale Theater: A hilarious and charming new webseries “Zombie Fairytale Theater”; where the zombies tell the stories. You can view the series HERE. (Yes, I used the words ‘hilarious’ and ‘charming’ with regard to zombies. I don’t know either.)

5. Zombie Fairy Tales by Jill Myles: “Collected here are 7 short, slightly twisted fairy tales retold from a zombie perspective. What if Cinderella had been undead when she went to the ball? What if Little Red Riding Hood went to Grandma’s house to eat her?”

6. A Very Zombie Fairy Tale! A play in Dublin that seems to have already run, but deserves a mention anyway due to it’s description: Zombies! Puppets! Musical Numbers! True Love! Sounds like a hoot, don’t you think?

7. Call for Fairy Tale Zombies Submission from Entangled in Romance: The deadline for it was summer 2012, so if you’ve got the sweetest, hottest zombie fairy tale romance sitting on your hard drive, alas you are too late. But! Surely the books or anthology should be available for purchase soon since the deadline for submission was last summer, right? Keep an eye out for it!


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Keira Andrews and Leta Blake write fairy tale inspired m/m erotica and romantica with Ellora’s Cave. Check out Ascending Hearts, available through Ellora’s Cave, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Sony, and others! And also remember to look at Earthly Desires, the first book in the Tempting Tales series, available for purchase at AmazonBarnes and Noble, and Ellora’s Cave.

Tempting Freebie – Introduction to Keira Andrews and Leta Blake

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Hi! This is Leta and Keira, authors of the Tempting Tales series from Ellora’s Cave. We published the first book in the series, Earthly Desires at the end of June, and are hoping the second book will be out before the end of the year. These novellas are erotic, m/m tales inspired by fairy and folk tales. We’re giving away an electronic copy of Earthly Desires, so please comment if you’d like to win it!

We decided that answering some faux interview questions might be a fun way to introduce ourselves.

1. What is it about fairy and folk tales that inspires you?

Keira: I love that many of these stories – particularly fairy tales – are larger than life, with epic journeys and romances. There’s so much freedom in the fantasy genre to create and expand on worlds that are so different from our own. Yet the characters face the same struggles we do, and we can connect with their struggles. I’m also a sucker for a happily ever after!

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Art by Threadless. Buy a t-shirt from them.

Leta: Keira stole my answer. Haha! Actually, to go a bit further with it, the most inspiring thing to me about fairy tales is how deeply erotic and symbolic they often are. On the surface, a story like Little Red Riding Hood, for example, is about a child on her way to Grandmother’s house with a basket of goodies who is waylaid by a dangerous wolf and the potentially terrible outcome of that. Generally, people see it as a tale of stranger danger, but it’s a highly charged tale of sexual temptation at its core. It’s not just the fear factor of the scary bad wolf that sends a thrill up the reader’s spine, but the fact that an elemental part of us recognizes the sexual awakening within the story and wants Red to be lured by the wolf to whatever outcome might befall her.

Fairy tales and folk tales are already sexually charged, and finding a way into those stories, so that I can play with the symbolism in ways that are fun or new-to-me, is very inspiring.

2. Why have you chosen to re-write the tales with homosexual characters, specifically m/m couplings? Do you plan to ever branch out to f/f tales?

Keira: We all grew up with these stories of princes and princesses, and we thought it would be exciting to reimagine the tales with two male protagonists. We also really dig hot guys having sex together. 😀 We’re focused at the moment on m/m, but I’m certainly not opposed to f/f, which is underrepresented in the romance genre, in my opinion.

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Art by Natalia Lopes.

Leta: There is definitely an appeal to hot men together, but, for me, the larger interest has always been in imagining how archetypal situations feel different and play out in different ways when the sex or gender of the protagonists are changed. I enjoy thinking about the various ways that Sleeping Beauty is a different story when Beauty is Beau, and he’s a very handsome dude. Because changing up the genders and sexes can be so much fun, I do hope to one day look at the f/f side of things and to possibly explore some trans characters within fairy tales settings. At this point, though, it appears that the first four stories will definitely be m/m. I have a story featuring a more gender-bending character in mind for Fall 2013, though, if our insane writing schedule goes according to plan. And I’d love to do a f/f tale in 2014, perhaps.

3. What was your favourite fairy tale as as child? Has it changed as an adult?

Keira: As a kid my favourite was Cinderella. I loved the Disney movie and that everyone was mean to poor Cinderella but she rose above it and found her prince. I actually don’t think it’s changed as an adult. I do have more appreciation for the darker tales that freaked me out as a kid (Hansel and Gretel was so upsetting to me!), but at heart I’m a hopeless romantic.

Leta: As a child, my favorite was The Elves and the Shoemaker. Now that I’m older, I think I like the more terrifying and symbolically erotic stories like Bluebeard, Rapunzel, or Red Riding Hood.

4. What other writing do you or have you done in the past? What can we anticipate from you aside from Tempting Tales in the next few years?

Keira: I’ve written a number of contemporary and historical romances, as well as a YA novel. Along with our m/m fairy tales, I’m working on a post-WWII historical at the moment. Also have many other ideas, so you can expect a variety of books in the future!

Leta: In the next year, in addition to the tales, I hope to finish my LGBT-themed coming-of-age book set in the recent past of the 1990s. I sincerely hope to find a good home for it in 2013. I have several novels of magical, speculative, and contemporary fiction in the works as well, and hope to have them completed over the next couple of years. I am eager to get these books out into the world. Some of them have really taken their time coming to fruition. In the end, I hope those who read them enjoy the stories as much as I’ve enjoyed writing them.

Don’t forget to comment to win an e-book of our first book in the Tempting Tales series!

Leta Blake and Keira Andrews write fairy tale inspired m/m erotica and romantica with Ellora’s Cave. Check out Earthly Desires, the first book in the series, available for purchase at AmazonBarnes and Noble, and Ellora’s Cave.

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