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Geronimo! Travelling with the Doctor!

What time do I want to live in? All of them, which is why I am hijacking this

There are just so many times to explore and I am not sure I’d actually would want to live in them. I remember reading a book where a modern woman travelled back to the Regency era. She was so excited to explore her favourite time until she opened the front door of the London house and got a whiff of the stench that must have been around during that time.

I imagine I probably would experience the same thing;). And a number of us have said it already:  chances are I won’t be one of the rich and famous, but some minion who has a short, hard life.

So, instead I’ll travel with the Doctor (any of them will be just fine, but David Tenant would be at the top of my list), jump throughout time, save the universe every other day and not have to worry about making a living when electricity is not around.

My first trip will be to meet Her Majesty Queen Victoria and, like Rose, I will do everything in my power to have her say “We are not amused!”;). Other than that I’d hang out for a few days to do some research for my next steampunk novel, the sequel to Rescue by Ruin.

The next stop would be the future, maybe the year 2000 or 3000 (maybe all the way to the end of earth), just so see what’s happening and what has changed. After saving whoever we bumped into, possibly nearly falling into a black whole and fighting some ancient evil, I’ll take the Doctor for a drink and check out the bars around town. In Tangled Indulgence I introduced a bar, Indulgence, and a connected sex club, Lust. I am considering starting a new series set in Indulgence/Lust, which means I need to do some research…

After ticking both of those off my list I am pretty much open to any time. It would be nice to see the pyramids and meet the Incas before their civilization was destroyed. I wouldn’t mind seeing a true samurai or a cowboy.

That’s me, footloose and fancy free and accompanying the Doctor. If you’re a Whovian like me, what is one of your favourite episodes and in what time period does it take place?

Tina Christopher

Writer of Sexy Steampunk and Sensuous Sci-Fi available at Ellora’s Cave and Amazon.

Which Place In Time

Do you suppose geekdom transcends lifetimes? I ask because this week’s question is which time period (past or imagined future) would you live in if you could. My problem is that there are so many cool mysteries about past time periods that I’d like answers to, but those questions are predicated on the knowledge we all have in the here and now. If I couldn’t take that curiosity, that sense of ‘ooo, cool’ with me, I don’t wanna go.

Case in point: Ancient Egypt. Who wouldn’t want to see the pyramids going up and know something about how that happened? I mean, there’s a huge difference between our ancient ancestors knowing far more about engineering than modern scientists imagine and ‘built by aliens’, right? The problem is that this is only fascinating if you aren’t one of the people breaking your back to either build those pyramids or support the builders. It’s only intriguing if you aren’t a slave in some household. It’s only interesting if you’re in the rarified position to be able to be fascinated by it rather than simply trying to survive. And given that the period is marked by distinct lines between the haves and the have nots, that’s assuming an awful lot.

pumapunkuThe other fascination is Puma Punku – this is a ruin in Bolivia. The stone construction blocks look a little like Legos in that they are slotted and carved to interlock. Some of that stone is incredibly hard stuff (some of it is sandstone, which isn’t all that hard). The site has been radiocarbon dated to roughly 500 AD – though, naturally, the stones can’t be dated – organic matter from the lowest layer of a debris mound was dated and is presumed to be concurrent to the carving of the stones and creation of what’s assumed to be a temple complex. The kicker is: No one *really* knows for certain what this site was or why it was created. It is a ruin. To the extent that many of the stones are shattered. Conspiracy theorists point out that some of the stones show evidence of extreme heat – the exposed surfaces have some of the constituent parts fused into glass. I totally want to know A) how this thing was built, B) why and C) how it was destroyed. That last one – preferably without being one of the casualties of whatever happened to blow that site to its current state. But again – I run into the notion that if I lived in that time, I’d take everything happening around me for granted. Also, I can’t help but note that in about 500 AD, I’d likely already be dead since the average life expectancy at that time was . . . short.

Okay. If I could live in any future? Give me one with commonplace interstellar travel. Assuming that any future with enough technology to handle that sort of travel has also come up with a cure for space sickness. Life wouldn’t be worth living if it was possible go into outer space, but you didn’t want to because you’d be miserable. I’d absolutely want to walk on another planet or find out how much the state of physics has changed in order to accommodate interstellar travel.

This is the long way of saying I’m mighty fond of this time I’m in right now. It’s a unique time in history, I think, because I have the luxury of day dreaming about what my life might be like in some other time period. Time periods, I might note, that often didn’t allow such luxury to anyone who wasn’t one of the one percent. And literate. Also? I really like flush toilets. Just saying.

Muppet-flailing, Fangirling and Restraining Orders

Alright, my fellow MANhandlers. I searched through many files to bring you this week’s delightful pic. Too delish.

This blog cycle, we’re talking about the author we’ve always wanted to be. This is a hard one for me because there are a so many authors I I seriously admire. Picking one would be like trying to pick my favorite MANhandler pic. Can’t I just love them all? Okay, okay. Let me think…

It’s no secret that I love Diana Gabaldon with a crazy passion that probably alarmed her a little the first time I met her. I’m 6’1″ and a naturally exuberant person. She’s probably 5’3″ and incredibly soft-spoken and even a bit reserved. It’s impossible to be as tall as I am and not feel like I’m looming over such petite people. And then, when the conference coordinators have her seated to meet her fans, I have to either bend over to shake her hand or kneel in front of her. Of course I knelt. What did security think would happen? Yeesh. Anyway, Diana’s literary voice is rich and varied, and I’ve coveted the almost melodic “sound” of her storytelling since I read the first page of Outlander. I’d love to create the passion in readers that she’s cultivated over the last twenty years. I’d also like to find myself still writing after that long. Above all, I’d like to look back over the stories that will create my legacy and know I touched readers, gave them respite from the world’s demands if only for a while and helped them fall in love with my characters the way I have.

Another un-secret is my passion for absolutely anything written by Larissa Ione. When we started chatting on social media and privately, there was some very private Muppet-flailing and a few total fangirl moments. When she first emailed me? I may or may not have screamed, depending on your definition of “scream.” She’s been amazing to me, and I want to do the same for other authors who are finding their way through the difficult world of publishing. But back to the point of this paragraph — I’ve found that, the more I write, the harder it is for me to read. I can’t turn off my internal editor. It seems like I’m always rearranging scenes, catching typos, counting the “to be” verbs — all the things we authors aren’t supposed to do if we want to find success. With Larissa’s books, I get sucked into the vibrant world, the relationships, the (hawt) sex, the storylines. I admire her ability to write such clean, crisp stories. Her creativity is off the charts. The way she crafts her worlds and scenes engage every one of the readers senses. That, that, is what I want to look back and know I’ve done.

Finally? I have to be very frank and admit that I want to be me. What I spend my days doing is a total dream come true. There’s no way to describe the feeling of getting that first contract, landing a superstar agent, having your editor call you (insert your definition of “spastic” here), or finding out your book received an awesome review from Romantic Times magazine. All of these things and more have come to mean more to me than I can explain. I love what I do. I’m passionate about it. It’s everything I ever dreamed it would be. It’s also infinitely more difficult, unbelievably frustrating, guaranteed tear-inducing at times and worth every damn minute.

There’s no one author I want to be, but the two listed above are people whose talent, compassion and magic I admire and aspire to. If I could mash their skill together and mix it in a potion, I’d drink it right down. At the very least, I’d end up with a restraining order. At best? I’d be everything I want to be. Instead of scaring these two lovely ladies, I think I’ll just bust my ass and do my best to follow in their footsteps. It might take longer, but it’s the only way I want to get there. Plus I don’t have bail money.  😀

Who are the authors that inspire you? If you could be any author in the world for a day and experience what it’s like to have their skill, who would it be?

Sassenachs and Ruddadills

Yummy KiltFor all my MANhandlers, today’s picture is a .gif taken from Google images. Given my penchant for men in kilts, particularly with Doc Marten’s (or, in this case, work boots), I thought this was totally appropriate. I want under his man-skirt in a bad way. LOL

Today’s blog topic is about favorite literary classics, past or present. I have to admit that my mind immediately went to Diana Gabaldon. There is no other book that moves me quite like Outlander. That this is the novel’s 20th anniversary only makes this blog post sweeter from me. I love all of the books that follow Outlander, provided they have Jamie Fraser in them, though Outlander will always be the first thing to cross my mind when someone asks me to name my favorite book. It was like losing my literary virginity in so many ways — thrilling, poignant, slightly painful, something worth doing sober and definitely worth the wait.

Diana’s tale covers Claire Randall, a Sassenach (foreigner) and nurse who served in World War II, who has just reunited with her husband in Scotland after (essentially) a seven year separation. Through an innocent turn of events, she passes through Craigh na Dun, a small standing stone circle and ends up in 1743. She’s subjected to a series of events that result in her marrying Jamie Fraser out of necessity despite the fact she’s still married to Frank Randall in 1947. She struggles with the morality of it, but she and Jamie ultimately fall in love. Real love. That kind of love that transcends time, space, distance, separation and the worst mankind can do to one another. Their love is rich and bitter and sweet, so real that I still get swept up in the tale every time I read it.

What is it about Diana Gabaldon that makes her writing so off-the-chain crazy good? It’s her ability to deal in human emotions, wrapping the story with actual significant historical events (i.e. the Scottish Uprising with the Bonnie Prince Charlie). There’s intrigue, family dynamics, politics, murder and more. I’m getting pulled into the memory of the story just writing this. I can see a re-read coming on. They’re going to make a mini-series out of the novel. The cable channel, Starz, has purchased the rights. I hope like mad they don’t screw it up. I haven’t decided if I’ll watch it or not. I don’t want it to ruin the images I have in my head of what the characters look like, Jamie Fraser in particular. Sometimes the classics should just be left alone.

My other favorite story is Watership Down. I first read this story in 5th grade. Yes, 5th grade. I had an amazingly gifted English teacher. While I didn’t understand the political position of the novel for years, this novel cemented my desire to write, particularly in worlds that parallel our own. The story covers a warren of rabbits who are driven from their home and forced to relocate to a safer place. There are dangers at every turn. “Ruddadills” (sp?) were cars. I remember the terror of having to cross the highway with the rabbits. I remember the emotions evoked in this tale of resettlement and the struggle to survive. That such a novel would stick with me for thirty years, that it would be one I can re-read even now and pick up new nuances, still amazes me. Ironically, this novel was made into a movie. It can’t hold a candle to the book.

Both books are classics, though very different. It strikes me now, as I write, that both deal in love and loss and political unrest. Strange that they both appeal to me so much and for such disparate and similar reasons. I’m off to ponder this, take a deeper look at meanings and messages and such.

Drop me a line and let me know what your favorite novel(s) is/are. I’m always on the lookout to find “new” classics. And what better place to get a recommended read than from a reader?

Scandalous Earls float my boat

Wow. Time gets away from ya when you’re having fun, doesn’t it?

I’ve spent the week celebrating (and writing blog posts, and checking rankings, and worrying myself silly) over the release of my alter ego’s first mainstream full-length novel, THE GEEK GIRL AND THE SCANDALOUS EARL. So much so that when I saw my reminder this morning that I was supposed to blog here today, I went EEP!!

I hope you’ll forgive me, and check out GGSE! It’s a steamy, humorous time travel romance. A modern gamer chick in Regency England. Hijinx and hot smexin’ ensue.

It’s available at these (and other!) places: Sourcebooks  ***  Barnes & Noble  ***  Amazon  ***  Kobo  ***  Discover A New Love

If you plan to check it out, let me know below!

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